Cambridgeshire County Towns

Cambridgeshire-header-w

Towns in Cambridgeshire

 

CB1 CB2 CB3 CB4 CB5
CB23
PE16
CB6 CB7
PE29
PE29
PE15
PE
PE26
PE27
PE19
CB7
PE7
PE13
CB21
SG8
CB23
CB23
CB22
CB21
CB3
CB21
SG8
CB24
CB23
CB22
CB24
PE29
PE28
PE2
PE8
PE28
PE26
PE28
PE27
PE19
PE7
PE8
PE28
PE7
PE16
PE15
PR13
PE7
PE15
PE13 PE14
CB6 CB7
CB7
CB7
CB6
CB6
CB7
CB6
PE1
PE6
PE6

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Cambridgeshire abbreviated Cambs., archaically known as the County of Cambridge, is an East Anglian county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the north-east, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. The city of Cambridge is the county town. Modern Cambridgeshire was formed in 1974 as an amalgamation of the counties of Cambridge and Isle of Ely and Huntingdon and Peterborough, which had been created in 1965 from the historic counties of Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, the Isle of Ely and the Soke of Peterborough. It contains most of the region known as Silicon Fen.

Local government is divided between Cambridgeshire County Council and Peterborough City Council, which is a separate unitary authority. Under the county council, there are five district councils, Cambridge City Council, South Cambridgeshire District Council, East Cambridgeshire District Council, Huntingdonshire District Council and Fenland District Council.

History

The County of Cambridge is noted as the site of Flag Fen in Fengate, one of the earliest-known Neolithic permanent settlements in the United Kingdom, compared in importance to Balbridie in Aberdeen, Scotland. A great quantity of archaeological finds from the Stone Age, the Bronze Age and the Iron Age were made in East of the County. Most items were found in Isleham.

The County of Cambridge was recorded in the Domesday Book as “Grantbridgeshire” (or rather Grentebrigescire) (related to the river Granta).

Covering a large part of East Anglia, Cambridgeshire today is the result of several local government unifications. In 1888 when county councils were introduced, separate councils were set up, following the traditional division of Cambridgeshire, for the area in the south around Cambridge, and the liberty of the Isle of Ely.

In 1965, these two administrative counties were merged to form Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely. Under the Local Government Act 1972 this merged with the county to the west, Huntingdon and Peterborough. (The latter had been organised in 1965 by the merger of Huntingdonshire with the Soke of Peterborough – previously a part of Northamptonshire which had its own county council). The resulting county was called simply Cambridgeshire.

Since 1998, the City of Peterborough has been a separately administered area, as a unitary authority. It is associated with Cambridgeshire for ceremonial purposes such as Lieutenancy, and joint functions such as policing and the fire service.

In 2002, the conservation charity Plantlife unofficially designated Cambridgeshire’s county flower as the Pasqueflower.

The Cambridgeshire Regiment (or Fen Tigers), the county-based army unit, fought in the Boer War of South Africa, the First World War and Second World War.

 

Due to the county’s flat terrain and proximity to the continent, during the Second World War the military built many airfields here for RAF Bomber Command, RAF Fighter Command, and the allied USAAF. In recognition of this collaboration, the Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial is located in Madingley. It is the only WWII burial ground in England for American servicemen who died during that event.

Most English counties have nicknames for their people, such as a “Tyke” from Yorkshire and a “Yellowbelly” from Lincolnshire. The traditional nicknames for people from Cambridgeshire are ” Camel” or “Crane”, referring to the wildfowl that were once abundant in the fens. The term “Fenners” was often applied to those who come from the flat country to the north of Cambridge. Since the late 20th century, this term is considered to be derogatory and has been discouraged in use.

Original historical documents are held by Cambridgeshire Archives and Local Studies.
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Cambridgeshire NEIGHBOURS

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