County Durham County Towns

County-Durham-Header-w

Towns in County Durham

DH1
DL10
DL14
DL17
DL17
DL5
DL15
SR8
SR7
TS21
DL4
DL16
DH9
DL13
DH8
DL15
TS29
DL1
DL5
DL13
TS28
DL13
DH2 DH3
DL1 DL3
DL3
DL3
DL3
DL1 DL2 DL3
DL1
DL3
DL1
DL1 DL3
DL3
DL1
DL3
DL3
DL1
DL1
DL3
DL2
L1
DL2
TS24 TS25 TR26
TS24 TS25 TR26
TS27
TS27
TS27
TS25
TS25
TS24
TS25
TS26
DL12
TS22
TS25
TS25
TS25
TS26
TS24
TS18 TS19 TS20 TS23
TS22 TS23
TS16
TS17
TS16 TS17 TS18 TS19 TS20 TS21
TS17
TS15

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County Durham

is a county in North East England. The county town is Durham, a cathedral city, whilst the largest settlement is Darlington. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. Historically, the county included southern Tyne and Wear, including Gateshead and Sunderland.

is a county in North East England. The county town is Durham, a cathedral city, whilst the largest settlement is Darlington. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. Historically, the county included southern Tyne and Wear, including Gateshead and Sunderland.

Industry

The county has a mixture of mining and farming heritage, as well as a heavy railway industry, particularly in the southeast of the county in Darlington, Shildon and Stockton. Its economy was historically based on coal and iron mining. It is an area of regeneration and promoted as a tourist destination; in the centre of the city of Durham, Durham Castle and Durham Cathedral are a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site.

Many counties are named after their principal town, and the expected form here would be Durhamshire, however this form has never been in common use. The ceremonial county is officially named Durham, however, the county has long been commonly known as County Durham and as such is the only English county name to be prefixed with “County” in common usage — a practice more common in Ireland. Its unusual naming (for an English county) is explained to some extent by the relationship with the Bishops of Durham, who for centuries governed Durham as a county palatine (the County Palatine of Durham), outside the usual structure of county administration in England. Thus “County Durham” is a shortened form of “County of Durham”.

The situation regarding the formal name with regards to present-day local government is less clear. The structural change legislation which in 2009 created the present unitary council (that covers a large part — but not all — of the ceremonial county) refers to “the county of County Durham” and named the new unitary district “County Durham” too. However, a later amendment to that legislation, refers to the “county of Durham”; the amendment allows for the unitary council to name itself “The Durham Council”, however the council has retained the name of Durham County Council — with either option, the name does not include County Durham.

The former postal county was named “County Durham” to distinguish it from the post town of Durham.

Politics

Local government

Flag of Durham County Council since 1974, based on the council’s coat of arms. This flag was used as an unofficial flag of County Durham until 2013.

The ceremonial county of Durham is administered by four unitary authorities. The ceremonial county has no administrative function, but remains the area to which the Lord Lieutenant of Durham and the High Sheriff of Durham are appointed.

County Durham (governed by Durham County Council): the unitary district was formed on 1 April 2009 replacing the previous two-tier system of a county council providing strategic services and seven district councils providing more local facilities. It has 126 councillors. The seven districts abolished were:

Chester-le-Street, including the Lumley, Pelton and Sacriston areas
Derwentside, including Consett and Stanley
City of Durham, including Durham city and the surrounding areas
Easington, including Seaham and the new town of Peterlee
Borough of Sedgefield, including Spennymoor and Newton Aycliffe
Teesdale, including Barnard Castle and the villages of Teesdale
Wear Valley, including Bishop Auckland, Crook, Willington, Hunwick, and the villages along Weardale

The Borough of Darlington: before 1 April 1997, Darlington was a district in a two-tier arrangement with Durham County Council.

The Borough of Hartlepool: until 1 April 1996 the borough was one of four districts in the relatively short-lived county of Cleveland, which was abolished.

The part of the Borough of Stockton-on-Tees that is north of the centre of the River Tees. Stockton was also part of Cleveland until that county’s abolition in 1996. The remainder of the borough is part of the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire.

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County Durham NEIGHBOURS

Northumberland

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