Herefordshire County Towns

Hereford County England

Towns in Herefordshire

HR2
HR7
HR4
HR3
WR13
HR1
HR1 to HR4
HR5
HR8
HR6
HR9

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Herefordshire (abbreviated Herefs. or Hfds.) is a historic English county in the West Midlands. It is a ceremonial county and a unitary non-metropolitan county and district, also named in legislation as the County of Herefordshire and governed by Hereford Council. It borders the English ceremonial counties of Shropshire to the north, Worcestershire to the east, Gloucestershire to the south-east, and the Welsh preserved counties of Gwent to the south-west and Powys to the west. The Welsh unitary county covering the part of Gwent next to Herefordshire is Monmouthshire.

Hereford is a cathedral city and is the county town; with a population of approximately 55,800 inhabitants, it is also the largest settlement. The county is one of the most rural and sparsely populated in England, with a population density of 82/km² (212/sq mi). The land use is predominantly agricultural, and the county is well known for its fruit and cider production, and the Hereford cattle breed.

Constitution

From 1974 to 1998, Herefordshire was part of the former non-metropolitan county of Hereford and Worcester.

Hereford was reconstituted both as a new district (effective 19 July 1996) and as a new county (coextensive with the area of the district above) (effective 1 April 1998) by Statutory Instrument as defined in The Hereford and Worcester (Structural, Boundary and Electoral Changes) Order 1996. This Order established Herefordshire as a unitary authority on 1 April 1998, combining county and district functions into a single council. Herefordshire is also commonly called a unitary district, but this is not official nomenclature. Herefordshire is officially known as a unitary authority for local government purposes. The Council created in 1998 with the new unitary district that absorbed the previous administrative areas of Leominster District Council, South Herefordshire District Council, Hereford City Council, parts of Hereford-Worcester County Council, and parts of Malvern Hills District Council.

The Lieutenancies Act 1997 made Herefordshire a ceremonial county, covering the exact area of the unitary district. For Eurostat purposes, it is a NUTS 3 region (code UKG11) and is one of three counties that comprise the “Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire” NUTS 2 region.

Physical geography

The River Wye, which at 135 miles (217 km) is the fifth-longest in the United Kingdom, enters the county after briefly being its border with Powys. It flows through both Hereford and Ross-on-Wye before returning to Wales. Leominster situated on the River Lugg, a tributary of the Wye.

There are two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the county. The Wye Valley is located in the river’s valleys south of Hereford, while the Malvern Hills are in the east of the county, along with its border with Worcestershire.

History

Herefordshire is one of the 39 historic counties of England.

In 1974 it was merged with neighbouring Worcestershire to form the Hereford and Worcester administrative county. Within this, Herefordshire the local government districts of South Herefordshire, Hereford, and part of Malvern Hills and Leominster areas. However, the county was dissolved in 1998, resulting in the return of Herefordshire and Worcestershire as counties.

The current ceremonial county and unitary district have broadly the same borders as the pre-1974 historic county.

Demographics

Population growth

The County growth rate has in recent decades been higher than the national average, with the population increasing by 14.4% between 1991 and 2011  The population of England as a whole increased by only 10.0%. However, this has been from a lower base, with only Northumberland and Cumbria having lower population densities than Herefordshire.

 

Herefordshire NEIGHBOURS

Shropshire

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